GeoSpectrum Technologies Inc. (GeoSpectrum) announces the successful deployment of their M72-1000 C-Bass VLF sound sources in the Arctic Ocean as the active component for low frequency thermometry experiments. The Coordinated Arctic Acoustic Thermometry Experiment (CAATEX), spearheaded by the Nansen Center of Bergen, Norway, marks the first time in 20 years that scientists will gather data of this nature from the Arctic Basin.

The CAATEX program is an international experiment comprising partners from the Norwegian Polar Institute, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, University of Texas-Austin, University of Bergen, NORCE, NTNU, Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Institute of Oceanology - Polish Academy of Sciences, and National Institute of Ocean Technology, India.

The two C-Bass sound sources are currently deployed on subsea moorings containing computers, signal generators, amplifiers, and batteries. These systems are programmed to transmit signals every third day for one year. On September 24 th, CAATEX scientists recorded and processed a regular transmission from a mooring on a sonobuoy located 400 nm (741 km) away. On September 30th, a signal was received from 1350 nm (2500 km) across the Arctic Basin -a range longer than any other Arctic system save for two brief experiments conducted in 1994 and 1999.

The C-Bass electrodynamic transducer is a flexible family with a variety of available sizes ranging from 1200 mm to 225 mm. With resonant frequencies as low as 15 Hz, and operating bands of as much as two decades, GeoSpectrum continues to hone the C-Bass family of sound source's capabilities.

GeoSpectrum's C-Bass sound sources are a significant innovation for the challenging domain of VLF sound source technology. C-Bass sources are smaller, lighter, more capable, less expensive, and offer greater reliability than legacy sources. The advent of C-Bass has allowed organizations of the CAATEX program to conduct low frequency acoustic tomography experiments more efficiently and less expensively than previously possible. 

Paul Yeatman, President of GeoSpectrum, commented: The CAATEX project is an exciting opportunity for GeoSpectrum to showcase innovative technology developed in Canada, on a global stage. It has been a pleasure to support the researchers involved in the project, which will help us all understand the extent of global warming on the arctic over the past 20 years.

GeoSpectrum Technologies is a Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Canada based supplier of marine acoustic hardware and systems. Its range of offerings include sonars and sonar upgrades (towed and hull mounted), acoustic communication, submarine targets, diver deterrent systems, moored surveillance solutions, Very Low Frequency (VLF) systems and more. The company supplies its products to the defence, oil and gas, surveillance, and environmental sectors. www.geospectrum.ca

GeoSpectrum is a wholly owned subsidiary of Elbit Systems Ltd.